Fortunately plenty of the pre-Colombian bling that fuelled the Spanish land-grab through the Americas in the 16th century slipped through the sloppy Conquistadores fingers and some of the best examples of intricate gold-work survived their indiscriminate plundering.

  • This Is What We Love

    • Finding real treasure here on our Treasure Hunt Tour which stops off in the museum
  • What You Need To Know

    • Entrance is Free
  • The Details

    Address: Meeting point: Centro, Calle Sargento Mayor, Calle 38, Cra 7, No. 6-107, Of 104, Cartagena, Colombia

    Rating: TIC User Rating

  • THE LOWDOWN

    Our Full Review

    Fortunately plenty of the pre-Colombian bling that fuelled the Spanish land-grab through the Americas in the 16th century slipped through the sloppy Conquistadores fingers and some of the best examples of intricate gold-work survived their indiscriminate plundering.

    Two main exhibits celebrate the intricate metallurgical and ceramic arts of the Zenú indigenous population that have inhabited the area between the Sinu and Magdalena Rivers for more than 2,000 years.

    Displays explore the traditions of the Zenú and other tribes throughout the country focusing in particular on the traditional methods of burying their dead in mounds that resemble the stomachs of pregnant women and the advanced drainage systems used to cultivate the lands to the north of the country.

    Gold has been central to the city's development since it was founded in 1533 and it was Cartagena's founder father, Pedro de Heredia that headed the first expedition up the River Sinú in search of the gold of the 'Mogote graves'.

    The plundering of Zenú graves along the Sinú and in the San Jorge and Cauca valleys was so successful, and the region was so rich in indigenous labour and cultivated products, that these financed local government in the city for decades.

LOCATION & MAP

  • Centro

    Cartagena's nerve centre serves up breathtaking colonial architecture, the city's top attractions, finest hotels, eateries and drinking dens as well as being the administrative and cultural heart of the city. 

    Centro has lost none of its importance thanks to the universal lure of its colonial pomp and the concentration of government buildings, hotels, tourist attractions, bars and restaurants in the area. 

    Cartagena's finest hotels and restaurants have taken over the uber-casas built by slave traders and Spanish plunderers in the 17th century. 

    The richest residents knocked up stunning two and three-storey mansions by the westernmost tip of the walled city, where they bagged the sea breeze and first whiff of pirates. Today only those at the very top of Colombia's rich list can afford to maintain these opulent houses in their original residential state.


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